Digital ‘Deep Play’: The Soft Politics of Iranian Photoblogs

Photography and the Greater Middle East

Tuesday, December 6, 2016| Clephan Building, room 2.30, 4-6pm

Open to all – just turn up!

waltonDr Shireen Walton (Teaching Fellow in Material and Visual Culture, Anthropology Department, University College London) will deliver the third and final talk in this term’s Research Seminars in Cultures of Photography series.

The autumn 2016 seminar series is dedicated to the theme of Photography and the Greater Middle East. In her talk, Digital ‘Deep Play’: The Soft Politics of Iranian Photoblogs, Shireen will argue that a defining characteristic of Iranian photoblogs is their visual-digital playing with dominant images of Iran (domestic and international). Many Iranian photobloggers take, exhibit and frame their digital photographs of everyday life inside the country in ways that seek to visually negotiate the aesthetic and political boundaries of what people (Iranians and non-Iranians, inside and outside of Iran) think post-revolutionary / contemporary Iran ‘is’ and/or looks like. Shireen’s talk will explore the soft political components of Iranian photoblogs. It will examine how this particular phenomenon – Iranian photoblogging from the early 2000s to the present – ties into wider visual / political debates concerning Iran and ‘the West’, the political ontology of photography, and the ‘everyday aesthetics’ of online digital photographic practices and cultures in non-western contexts.

In case of queries contact Dr Gil Pasternak gpasternak@dmu.ac.uk

PHRC Annual Conference 2017 – Call for Papers

Call for Papers

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to phrc@dmu.ac.uk no later than Friday 3 February 2017.

Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds

phrc2017

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

19-20 June 2017

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @PHRC_DeMontfort

Conference hashtag #PHRC17

The consequences of the expansion of photographic practices around the globe are many and varied. Social interactions through and with analogue and digital photographs and the platforms across which photography is shared and disseminated keep challenging traditional socio-cultural boundaries. For its 2017 conference, Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds, PHRC is particularly interested in how these processes affect peoples whose photographic histories are currently understudied. These may be (but are not limited to) African, Central American and Middle Eastern cultures.

Diverse Migrations: Photography out of Bounds seeks to interrogate what social and other meaningful photographic practices emerge when photographs cross boundaries, and move between individuals, places, and distinct cultural environments. Paper proposals may concentrate on the following themes and other related subject matters:

  • transnational and/or emerging photographic practices
  • cross-cultural knowledge exchange through photography
  • migrations across media
  • sharing and exchanging photographs
  • global forums for photography and its theorisation

Papers are welcome from all career stages.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to phrc@dmu.ac.uk no later than Friday 3 February 2017.

Re-imagined Communities: Understanding the Visual Habitus of Transcultural Photographs

Photography and the Greater Middle East

Tuesday, November 29, 2016| Clephan Building, room 2.30, 4-6pm

Open to all – just turn up!

carolineCaroline Molloy (PhD Candidate at the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, Birkbeck, University of London) will deliver the second talk in this term’s Research Seminars in Cultures of Photography series.

The autumn 2016 seminar series is dedicated to the theme of Photography and the Greater Middle East. Caroline Molloy’s talk, Re-imagined Communities: Understanding the Visual Habitus of Transcultural Photographs, will explore migrant transcultural identities. Caroline will discuss her ongoing MPhil/PhD research that explores how the photographic studio can contribute to migrant identity formation. Using the London-Turkish community as a case study, her research draws from multi-sited ethnographic research within the photo-digital studio. Looking at the photo-digital studio photograph as a discursive cultural object, Caroline considers the “anthropology of the image” in relation to cultural practices within the community and relevant scholarly literature. She builds on existing literature that explores the impact of the diaspora on migrant communities, raising questions about imagined communities, nation-ness and identity formation. In her talk, Caroline will argue that the photographic studio is a transformative site, where the construction of cultural and cross-cultural identity is performed. In doing this, she will reason that the identities performed are neither specifically English nor Turkish, but an alchemy of what one of her research participants called “London-Turkish identity”.

In case of queries contact Dr Gil Pasternak gpasternak@dmu.ac.uk