PhD funding available through AHRC Midlands 4 Cities/ Collaborative Doctoral Award scheme

From Stoke Mandeville 1944 to London 2012: Photography and the Making of the Paralympic Community in Britain

 

The Photographic History Research Centre (PHRC) and the International Centre for Sports History and Culture (ICSHC), de Montfort University, in collaboration with the National Paralympic Heritage Trust (NPHT) are currently offering a PhD position on the photographic history of the Paralympic community in Britain.

Supervisors: Dr Beatriz Pichel (PHRC), Heather L Dichter (ICSHC) and Vicky Hope Walker (NPHT)

Deadline: 14 January 2020

Description of the project:

This project will examine the formation of the Paralympic community through the study of the NHPT photographic collections. This archive follows a community-centred approach. It reflects the daily life of disabled athletes, and not just the elite or mega-events, and aims to bring the photographs back to their regional communities through itinerant exhibitions, currently planned for Norfolk, Bradford, Manchester, Bath and London. By closely analysing the growing NHPT photographic collection, the student will identify how athletes, coaches, medical staff and families have used photography to define themselves as a ‘community’ and how they have used sport to frame and represent their disabilities. Understanding how the Paralympic community has appropriated medical images or the stories that Paralympians tell when seeing the NHPT photographs will challenge public perceptions about individuals with disabilities and will present new critical insights into the formation of sports communities, representations and disability.

The proposed CDA project will 1) determine the key role photographic representations have played in building the Paralympic community; 2) demonstrate the public impact and academic value of incorporating photographic collections into sport heritage projects and activities; 3) will consolidate the reputation of DMU as a leading institution in interdisciplinary arts and humanities research based on knowledge co-production with heritage institutions such as NHPT at regional and national levels.

The outcomes of this project will be the result of the co-creation of knowledge between the student, the academics at DMU and the NPHT. The PhD student will be key to maintain and enhance the NPHT Paralympic heritage by means of 1) contextualising the existing photographic collection, 2) compiling oral histories related to the Paralympic movement in the Midlands and 3) contributing to a Midlands version of the itinerant NPHT exhibition, which will take place in 2024. Unlike other NPHT exhibitions, the Midlands exhibit will be specifically designed for the region and will be the product of the M4C CDA, as the NPHT is not currently planning to tour the exhibition anywhere in the Midlands.

You can find more information about the project here: https://www.midlands4cities.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/From-Stoke-Mandeville-1944-to-London-2012-DMU.pdf

Funding is available for 4 years (or 8 for part-time study), which includes fees for both UK and EU applicants and maintenance grant for UK applicants (where institutional funds allow, M4C may be able to offer a maintenance grant to EU applicants), plus opportunities for additional funding. You can find more information through the Midlands 4 cities portal: https://www.midlands4cities.ac.uk/our-offer/

To apply, please consult the Midlands 4 Cities portal, where you can find all the information about the application process: https://www.midlands4cities.ac.uk/apply/

For more information about the project, please contact Dr Beatriz Pichel: beatriz.pichel@dmu.ac.uk

Clothing, fashion and nation building in the ‘Land of Israel’

How does clothing become fashion? To what extent does a consensual mode of dress emerge within a heterogeneous migrant society? How can clothing become political and to what extent can it express power relations? And which role does visual culture and photography play in communicating and enforcing changing clothing ideals?

These questions lie at the core of Dr Svenja Bethke’s research project Clothing, fashion and nation building in the ‘Land of Israel’, that has been awarded a Marie Curie Individual Fellowship by the European Commission. During the period of the fellowiship Dr Bethke will be hosted at the Hebrew University (Jerusalem), the Yad Ben Zvi Institute (Jerusalem) and also in the PHRC at De Montfort University, where Dr Bethke will work closely with Reader in Social and Political Photographic Cultures, Dr Gil Pasternak.

Taking the ‘Land of Israel’ as a case study, Dr Bethke argues that investigating clothing, fashion and aesthetic perceptions brings to the fore the agency of migrant groups and adds a personal dimension to the history of nation building. Focusing on the period from the 1880s, when large-scale migration began, until the foundation of the Israeli state in 1948, Dr Bethke will investigate how Eastern European and German Jewish immigrants expressed social, cultural and political belonging through clothing and to what extent they were able to enforce their ideologies in the course of nation building. Dr Bethke ask to what extent the immigrants influenced each other in developing a specific mode of dress, and how they referenced the socio-cultural and political practices of their countries of origin, as well as the clothing of Arab people and the Ottoman and British occupying authorities.

With an unprecedented focus on gender and visual materials, Dr Bethke will draw from collections preserved by 15 archives in Israel, Poland and England, and 6 Israeli, German, American and Russian databases. The project will analyse private and public photographs and posters, and contextualise them against an assessment of written material and oral history interviews.

The three months of secondment at the PHRC under the supervision of Dr Gil Pasternak will enhance Dr Bethke’s methodological skills in the analysis of historical photographs. Through this highly interdisciplinary training, Dr Bethke aims to develop a new methodology that will integrate approaches from fashion history and visual culture into the history of nation building to shed light on the processes of negotiation and power struggles on the micro level of a community.

In times of mass migration, economic exploitation and global mobility, the project will contribute to an understanding of aesthetic perceptions, dress and beauty ideals as an expression of power, integration and exclusion.

PHRC Annual Conference 2020 | Call for Papers

Camera Education

Photographic Histories of Visual Literacy, Schooling, and the Imagination

 

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

When: 15-16 June 2020

Where: De Montfort University, Leicester UK, Room TBC

 

Confirmed keynote speakers to date:

 

Professor Jane Lydon, Wesfarmers Chair of Australian History (the University of Western Australia)

Professor Andrés Zervigón, Professor of the History of Photography (Rutgers University, USA)

Darren Newbury, Professor of Photographic History Photography (The University of Brighton, UK)

 

Follow us on Twitter @PHRC_DeMontfort

Conference hashtag #PHRC20

 

Photography has been entangled with education processes for nearly two centuries. For much of that time, photography has been used to communicate information, cement knowledge, and train individuals, groups, and machines alike in visual literacy and the meaning of cultural customs. In the late twentieth century, photography became absorbed into academia as a subject of study. In more recent years, photographic historians and scholars have also begun to consider photography, photographs, and photographic practices as a means to tap into diverse historical processes at large. This paradigm shift has also resulted in various instances in which photography studies has been incorporated into the academic curriculum as a prism through which historical, social, cultural, and political phenomena can be studied.

In its 8th Annual Conference, the Photographic History Research Centre (PHRC) invites applicants to consider the role of photography in education as well as particular histories of intersections between the two. Themes may include (but are not limited to):

  • Photography in schooling programmes
  • Photography and visual literacy
  • The development of photographic education
  • Photographs in the classroom
  • Photography as an auxiliary to art, archaeological and historical education
  • Education and the photographic industry
  • Photographic technologies in education systems
  • Photographs as participants in familial/domestic education processes
  • Photography in social and political propaganda
  • Photography-based teaching/learning/training
  • Uses of photographic technologies in artificial intelligence
  • Digital humanities and photographic history
  • The influence of photographic vision on memory, remembering and the imagination
  • Educational uses of photographs on New Media platforms.
  • Photography and “how-to” guides.
  • The material culture of photography education.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to phrc@dmu.ac.uk by 7 January 2020. Include your name, affiliation and contact details in the same document but please do not send a cv.

For any queries please email: phrc@dmu.ac.uk

The Business of Photography – #PHRC19 Annual Conference, 17-18 June 2019

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

When: 17-18 June 2019

Where: De Montfort University, Leicester UK, Queens building, room 1.12, see, Campus Map

Registration now closed!

Conference Programme: Click here for a PDF download

 

Keynote speakers:

 

Michelle Henning, Professor in Photography and Cultural History, University of West London. Lecture title: Colorsnap! Aesthetics, Technology and Capital in the 1928 Boom

 

Jennifer Tucker, Associate Professor of History and Science in Society, Wesleyan University (Middletown, Connecticut). Lecture title: Arming Society with Cameras: The Interlocked Histories of Photography and Gun Manufacture

 

Plenary speakers:

 

Elizabeth Edwards FBA, Professor Emerita in Photographic History, Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University. Lecture title: Marketing ‘Knowledge Objects’: Photographic Recodability as Business Opportunity

 

Steve Edwards, Professor of History and Theory of Photography, Birkbeck, University of London. Lecture title: Icebergs, or from Art to Business and Back

 

Follow us on Twitter @PHRC_DeMontfort

Conference hashtag #PHRC19

 

‘Business’ can have many meanings. In the most straightforward sense, it refers to the photographic marketplace, its industry and the commercial relations established among different agents. Some of these actors, such as studios and companies of the like of Kodak and Ilford, are specifically photographic and have featured prominently in histories of photography. But the photographic business also depends on other social, cultural and economic agents like chemical supply companies, image brokers, content providers, commissioning editors, advertising campaign managers and digitization officers, among others.

Especially since the beginning of the 21st century, historians have begun to pay attention to the broader implications of what one might call ‘the business of photography’. In this sense, it is not only about commerce and trade, but also about visual and material economies, where photography and the many worlds and people it affects directly or indirectly negotiate, define or transform social, cultural, political, scientific, and other ideological environments as well as values.

In this 7th annual conference of the PHRC, we intend to stretch the notion of ‘the business of photography’. While not neglecting the transformative role of photographic companies and that of photographers as businessmen and women, we wish to diversify our understanding of ‘business’ to include the circulation of and the impact exerted by photographic images, objects and raw materials.

The conference will feature seven panels – Influencing Taste; Business-Education / Education-Business; Bureaucratic Record Economies; New Markets; Distribution; Business Administration; Causes and Costs – and the selected papers will think outside of the box while addressing themes such as:

  • Photographic recycling
  • The life of photographic raw materials
  • Gender and photographic businesses
  • The marketization of individual and collective identities
  • Photographic image banks
  • Photography in political and financial economies
  • Photography in the heritage industry

Registration now close!

For any queries please email: phrc@dmu.ac.uk

PHRC Annual Conference 2019 | Call for Papers

The Business of Photography

Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

When: 17-18 June 2019

Where: De Montfort University, Leicester UK (Room TBC).

Registration: Not Open Yet

Conference Programme: TBC

Keynote speakers: TBC

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @PHRC_DeMontfort

Conference hashtag #PHRC19

Paper proposal deadline: 25 January 2019

 

Keynote speakers:

 

Michelle Henning, Professor in Photography and Cultural History, University of West London

Jennifer Tucker, Associate Professor of History and Science in Society, Wesleyan University (Middletown, Connecticut).

 

‘Business’ can have many meanings. In the most straightforward sense, it refers to the photographic marketplace, its industry and the commercial relations established among different agents. Some of these actors, such as studios and companies of the like of Kodak and Ilford, are specifically photographic and have featured prominently in histories of photography. But the photographic business also depends on other social, cultural and economic agents like chemical supply companies, image brokers, content providers, commissioning editors, advertising campaign managers and digitization officers, among others.

Especially since the beginning of the 21st century, historians have begun to pay attention to the broader implications of what one might call ‘the business of photography’. In this sense, it is not only about commerce and trade, but also about visual and material economies, where photography and the many worlds and people it affects directly or indirectly negotiate, define or transform social, cultural, political, scientific, and other ideological environments as well as values.

In this 7th annual conference of the PHRC, we invite 20-minute papers stretching the notion of ‘the business of photography’. While not neglecting the transformative role of photographic companies and that of photographers as businessmen and women, we encourage submissions that stretch our understanding of ‘business’ to the circulation of and the impact exerted by photographic images, objects and raw materials. We invite papers that think outside of the box, and address themes like:

  • Photographic recycling
  • The life of photographic raw materials
  • Gender and photographic businesses
  • The marketization of individual and collective identities
  • Photographic image banks
  • Photography in political and financial economies
  • Photography in the heritage industry
  • Photographs, photographers and algorithms

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to phrc@dmu.ac.uk no later than Friday, the 25th of January 2019.

For any queries please email: phrc@dmu.ac.uk

Dr Gil Pasternak wins grant of over £500,000 for digital heritage project

Dr Gil Pasternak of De Montfort University Leicester (DMU) has secured a grant of over £500,000 for a project exploring the role of digital media in defining cultural heritage.

 

Dr Pasternak, Senior Research Fellow in Photographic History, will lead the DigiCONFLICT research consortium consisting of a team of researchers from DMU, the Institute of Art of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Linköping University in Sweden.

The grant was awarded by the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage (JPICH), which is part of the European Commission, and fits with the European Union’s Year of Cultural Heritage taking place during 2018.

The project will run between 2018 and 2021 to explore how national and ethnic communities around the world have used digital heritage to define and preserve their cultural assets and sense of morality.

With their research mainly considering case studies from Sweden, Israel and Poland, the three partner institutions will focus on oral history, multimedia museums and photography as the most commonly used media employed in digital heritage.

They will also commission other scholars, curators, archivists, digitisation officers and librarians from around the world to write related essays to give the project a bigger spread of data.

“We will be looking into the realities that have been established around digitisation and digitalisation practices,” Dr Pasternak explained.

“Digital heritage has largely become a lynchpin of educational and ideological efforts. As such it allows us to explore how established nations, culturally diverse societies and ethnic minorities transform around its making and dissemination.

“We will be looking at what happens to historical narratives, moral values and national and personal identities when politicians, policymakers, third-sector professionals and community members come together to turn tangible and intangible cultural products into digital data.”

Originally from Israel, now British, and of Jewish and Polish heritage, Dr Pasternak feels the subject matter of the project is of significance to individuals and societies alike. But he also believes that the current global interest in the impact of politics on national and personal identities makes this the perfect time to embark on this project.

He said: “At the moment we are living in a time when it is plainly visible how culture and cultural differences have become key political benefits as well as challenges in many countries.

“We will be looking into the way that majority and minority communities turn to digital heritage in order to claim and reshape spaces, histories and various social rights.

“Digital heritage is a medium that confronts the past and the present with each other, so our research will have both historical and contemporary value.”

Dr Pasternak believes that this research project will be of great scholarly and social use and that it links directly to DMU’s research strategy, which aims to focus on research with a strong societal impact.

He added: “This project is of great significance and importance because digital heritage now has immense influence on the way people learn about themselves and about each other. Inasmuch as it can help build bridges between cultures, it may as well be used to marginalise, even destroy others.

“It’s incredibly tough to secure a grant in arts and humanities nowadays, let alone a large grant like this. The DigiCONFLICT consortium and I consider it a great achievement to have been awarded this grant.
“But what is much more important is that success like this should in my view reinstate a sense of confidence in the mission of scholars who still believe education can make a positive difference in society.”