SPRING 2018

RESEARCH SEMINARS IN CULTURES OF PHOTOGRAPHY, SPRING TERM 2018

 

Clephan Building, room CL2.02b, Mondays 5.00-6.30pm

Open to all – just turn up!

February 5, 2018| Professor Michelle Henning (University of West London)

Ilford Photographic Manufacturers: Industry, Innovation and Sensory Experience

James Jarché, Coating glass plates at the Ilford factory, 1933. Daily Herald Archive

This presentation outlines my new research project, which will investigate practices of technical innovation in the work of the Ilford Ltd. Photographic company and early colour photography enterprises during WWI and in the interwar period. Innovations include the introduction of daylight loading roll film and Ilford Special Rapid Panchromatic Plates (1915), the introduction of HP and infra-red films in the early 1930s, the introduction of colour film processes such as Dufaycolor and the early development of multigrade paper in 1939. Also circa 1928 a number of colour photography companies were floated on the stock market, as part of the boom in financial speculation. The Colour Snaps company collaborated with Ilford in 1928-30, although Boots the Chemists  expressed concern about the quality and viability of its process, and the company soon folded.

My research asks how industry archives might provide a source for a materialist history which is concerned not only with empirical description and analysis but with more elusive questions of a changing aesthetic and sensory “economy” in Britain during this period. My first step is to track technical, especially chemical, innovations and gain a sense of their impact on photographic practice across diverse fields. How did these address specific problems or needs such as those arising from war, economic changes, or new business and retail practices? The next step is more difficult: I want to ask how did these feed into the ongoing process by which technical images were being integrated into larger everyday experiences? This involves understanding photography not simply as a prosthetic means for extending human vision, but as something which transforms experience, understanding, sensory engagement with the world, habit and behaviour.  For this paper, I will discuss some aspects of the archive, aspects of existing studies of photographic companies (Kodak, Corbis, Polaroid and others) and outline some of the key theoretical approaches that might help us unpick the question of transformation of sensory experience.

Michelle Henning is a writer and artist, and is Professor of Photography and Cultural History at the University of West London. She writes on photography, modernism, new media, and museums. Her latest book is Photography: The Unfettered Image (forthcoming Routledge, 2018).

March 12, 2018| 2 papers by PHRC doctoral students

 

First paper: Erika Lederman

Women Photographers, Institutional Practices and the South Kensington Museum

PH.113A-1891; 666-1890, Photograph. Carved walnut wood frame with glass mirror; Photograph by Isabel Agnes Cowper (1826-1911). Carved walnut wood frame with glass mirror, Italian, 16th century, albumen print, ca. 1891. South Kensington Museum 1890-1891.

This seminar paper will locate the career of 19th century institutional photographer Isabel Agnes Cowper within the history of the photography and the institutional history of the South Kensington Museum (now the Victoria and Albert Museum).  It will present the biographical details I have uncovered to date, and will identify other 19th century female professional photographers from whom the SKM acquired photographs.  It will examine the challenges involved in identifying and researching material culture produced by women and will suggest a multidisciplinary research approach that acknowledges the multiple strands of photography’s history.

Second paper: Catherine Troiano

Future of the Past: Commemorating 150 years of photography in Hungary, 1989

In 1989, exhibitions of photography were staged around the world to mark 150 years since the announcement of the medium. In Hungary, the commemorations comprised twelve exhibitions staged in Budapest and collectively titled ‘the month of photography’. These events came at a poignant moment culturally, socially and politically. This paper aims to use the anniversary celebrations as a case study through which to understand photography’s place and purpose in Hungary’s broader socio-cultural landscape. It interprets the 1989 events as a lens into the Communist past and a forebear of the Democratic future, exploring how photography was posited within the framework of this political change.

April 9, 2018| Dr. Michael Pritchard, FRPS (Director General Royal Photographic Society)

For ‘the interchange of thought and experience among photographers’: The role of the photographic society in British photography

The Photographic Society summer outing, Hampton Court, 1856. © Royal Photographic Society/National Museum of Science & Media / Science & Society Picture Library.

Based on the early stages of a new research project, in this paper Michael Pritchard will look at the formation of the first photographic societies and, using the example of the Photographic Society [of London], the predecessor of the Royal Photographic Society, he will examine its activities and assess their impact and sets them within the wider context of British photography up to c1914.

 

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